Last edited by JoJokora
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

6 edition of Why is Mommy Sad? A Child"s Guide to Parental Depression found in the catalog.

Why is Mommy Sad? A Child"s Guide to Parental Depression

by Paul D. Chan

  • 278 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by Current Clinical Strategies Publishing .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Health, Mind & Body / Mental Health,
  • Family - Parents,
  • Social Issues - Depression & Mental Illness,
  • Social Science - Psychology,
  • Juvenile Nonfiction,
  • Children: Grades 1-2

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsLaurie A. Faust (Illustrator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages12
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12299950M
    ISBN 101929622716
    ISBN 109781929622719
    OCLC/WorldCa85827195

    A Child’s Book About Parental Depression American Psychological Association, United States, Related to Parental mental illness. Read Book 'When a parent experiences depression, children often feel sad and confused themselves. This interactive book can help by: explaining depression and its treatment in child-friendly terms.   Too many children -- many from affluent homes -- suffer from neglect that is the root of their depression, he says. "I work with a lot of teenagers. The No. 1 issue is the staggering neglect.

      Parents with depression often suffer in silence, but this common illness can affect their families as well. Here's how to seek treatment and help your children cope.   Wishing to just be a regular mom. "Every day is a struggle with depression and I've had to change my expectations. I don't care if I am never super mom.

    Get this from a library! Why are you so sad?: a child's book about parental depression. [Beth Andrews, (Clinical social worker); Nicole Wong] -- Defines depression, identifies depression treatments, and provides many self-help options for those coping with a depressed parent. Includes a note to parents and spaces for writing questions or. Depression and Your Child: a Guide for Parents and Caregivers. Deborah Serani, $ Seeing your child suffer in any way is a harrowing experience for any parent. Mental illness in children can be particularly draining due to the mystery surrounding it, and the issue of diagnosis at such a tender age.


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Why is Mommy Sad? A Child"s Guide to Parental Depression by Paul D. Chan Download PDF EPUB FB2

The last page talks about how it is not the child's job to make the parent happy, and that it is not the child's fault if the parent isn't happy. As an advocate of mental health awareness and reducing the stigma surrounding mental illness, I talk to my children/friends/family about my bipolar depression on a regular basis/5(13).

The last page talks about how it is not the child's job to make the parent happy, and that it is not the child's fault if the parent isn't happy.

As an advocate of mental health awareness and reducing the stigma surrounding mental illness, I talk to my children/friends/family about my bipolar depression on /5.

Because of this book and the opportunities it gives us to talk about my depression, my daughter has a basic but solid idea about depression, medication, and everything else it entails The title of the book and the subject matter may seem a little bit laughable to anyone outside of my situation, but I am so glad this book 4/5.

Why is Mommy Sad. A Child's Guide to Parental Depression by MD Paul D. Chan () [MD Paul D. Chan] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Why is Mommy Sad. A Child's Guide to Parental Depression by MD Paul D. Chan ()/5(12). Why is mommy sad?: a child's guide to parental depression Paul D Chan ; Laurie A Faust In simple text, explains to young readers what depression is and provides examples of how parents may react with depression, such as feeling tired, yelling, and wanting to be alone.

This illustrated book helps a child understand a parent's depression. We need more books on this topic, especially when my favorite one, Please Don't Cry Mom, is out of print. Why Are You So Sad gives straightforward information, but the plot and illustrations seem one dimensional.

I did not find myself drawn in by the characters/5(16). Title: Why Is Mommy Sad?: A Child's Guide to Parental Depression Format: Paperback Product dimensions: X X in Shipping dimensions: X X in Published: Ma Publisher: Current Clinical Strategies Publishing Inc.

Language: English. Laurie A. Faust is the author of Why Is Mommy Sad. A Child's Guide To Parental Depression ( avg rating, 15 ratings, 1 review, published ), France /5(2). Depression causes many people to be impatient, to be more irritable, and to get angrier than normal. It can also cause someone to feel sad and cry a lot.

These reactions from a parent can be very hard on children. A person with depression may get tired more easily and spend a lot of time in bed. Nurturing Parents May Lower the Risk of Depression In Kids; Before I go further, let me say this: I realize that there are many toxic parents of adult children out there.

If you are an adult. Although each child’s experience is unique, living with a parent with major depression can be embarrassing, confusing, lonely and scary.

As highlighted in this newsletter, youth growing up with parents dealing with depression are at greater risk of emotional problems themselves due to both genetic factors and psychosocial experiences.

A Child's Guide to Parental Depression by Paul D. Chan, unknown edition, A Child's Guide to Parental Depression (July 3, edition) | Open Library Donate ♥. The book has been written to reflect the concerns and questions a preschooler might have, and is structured to present a supportive conversation between a child and parent, in which the mother shares some important, age- appropriate information about depression.

Parental depression is a pervasive problem, and a large and growing body of research shows that it is a major risk factor for difficulties in a child’s life, says Megan Smith, PhD, co-director of the Parenting Center at the Yale Medicine Child Study Center and director of the New Haven Mental Health Outreach for Mothers (MOMS) Partnership.

Why Is Mommy So Sad. A Child’s Guide to Parental Depression. Finding My Way: A Teen’s Guide to Living with a Parent Who Has Experienced Trauma. I’m Not Alone: A Teen’s Guide.

Why Are You So Sad. contains a comprehensive and authoritative note to parents by therapists from the disciplines of clinical social work and clinical psychology. About the Author Beth Andrews, LCSW, is a therapist with an expertise in counseling parents with depression. Common among this adult child population, the parents, and consistent with the myriad of comments from my readers on this topic, are stories of substance misuse, depression.

Depression is one of the most common mental health disorders in the United States, affecting over 16 million prevalence of depression among parents of children under age 18 is similar to that in the adult population generally.

Both mothers and fathers experience depression, and approximately million children—1 in 5—live with an parent who is severely depressed. Mary Determan has a Masters Degree in Social Work. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Wisconsin, and a Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor.

I know this is hard for you, not understanding why your child feels this way. Depression is a hard thing to discuss. It’s even harder to understand sometimes.

For people who don’t have depression, it can be hard to understand why people don’t want to live anymore. They have a good life, a. Dr. William Beardslee, author of "When a Parent is Depressed: How to Protect Your Children From the Effects of Depression in the Family," says depressed moms can be great parents with the proper support and treatment 1 2 4.

Depressed mothers can seek treatment in the form of therapy, medication or both. Support groups might also be helpful. Ages There's little in the way of character development or imagination evidenced here. However, this unusual book, narrated by a young African American boy whose mother evinces symptoms of clinical depression, will be of help to parents trying to explain the illness to young s: 1.

(Dr. William R. Beardslee recommends avoiding the word depression until a child is at least 8.) Above all, kids need to know that their parents are going to be okay.

Let them ask questions.